Track 13: Serious Gaming


Long Papers


 

Short Papers


 

On Message: Using an Online Interactive Simulation to Train Crisis Communicators

Devin Hayes Ellis

ABSTRACT

Crisis communication research emphasizes the necessity for organized, informed, and effective strategies when engaging audiences. However it is often difficult to apply best practices from academic literature in real life situations. One way to bridge this gap is with an interactive simulation, which lets participants to test their ability to operate in a crisis. This paper describes the creation and implementation of an online crisis communication simulation developed for the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). The simulation uses a server-side software platform called ICONSnet™, which allows complexity in its design with both minimal overhead costs and human facilitation difficulties.

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A foray into the use of serious games in controlled research on crisis management

Michael E. Stiso, Aslak W. Eide, Antoine Pultier

ABSTRACT

Controlled experiments on crisis management could provide many insights into the human factors that lead to effective performance in the area. However, the challenge of establishing a controlled environment directly relevant to the chaotic settings in which crisis management occurs means that such experiments are scarce. Here, we describe our attempt to use a videogame (ARMA III) as a realistic but controllable environment for research in this domain. We successfully developed a testbed linking the game world to the front-end of a prototype command-and-control system, so that one can use the latter to monitor events in the former. However, when it came to developing controlled scenarios for the experiment, we discovered that too much realism can be a problem. This paper outlines the challenges we encountered and provides recommendations for researchers and game designers interested in the use of serious games in scientific research.

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Are you Ready! to take early action? Embedding serious gaming into community managed DRR in Bangladesh

Dr. Marc van den Homberg, Lydia Cumiskey, Dr. Esther Oprins, Dr. Pablo Suarez, Dr. Anja van der Hulst

ABSTRACT

This paper applies a Game-based Learning Evaluation Model (GEM) to assess whether the early warning – early action serious game “Ready!” is an effective component to add to existing Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) training curricula, facilitated by NGO staff and applied at the community level. We developed a paper-based survey with 17 five-level Likert items and 15 open questions addressing the different GEM indicators to question 16 NGO staff, and used a simplified set of five questions with emoticons for 58 community people. The results showed that the staff saw great potential in embedding Ready! in DRR processes and that the community highly appreciated the game. The GEM was found to be a useful methodology to evaluate the effectiveness of this serious game. However, in the context of a lower educated and partly illiterate community, the importance of designing an individual, largely visual assessment instrument instead of a paper-based survey was acknowledged.

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