Track 12: Researching Crisis: Methodologies


Long Papers


 

Short Papers


 

Insights from Modeling Epidemics of Infectious Diseases – A Literature Review

Elisa Canzani, Ulrike Lechner

ABSTRACT

The relevance of modeling epidemics’ spread goes beyond the academic. The mathematical understanding of infectious diseases has become an important tool in policy making.  Our research interest is modeling of dynamics in crisis situations. This paper explores the extant body of literature of mathematical models in epidemiology, with particular emphasis on theories and methodologies used beyond them. Our goal is to identify core building blocks of models and research patterns to model the dynamics of crisis situations such as epidemics. The wide range of applications of epidemic models to many other disciplines that show biological analogies, makes this paper helpful for many modelers and mathematicians within the broader field of Crisis Management.

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Towards More Relevant Research on Humanitarian Disaster Management Coordination

Laura Laguna Salvadó, Matthieu Lauras, Tina Comes, Bartel Van de Walle

ABSTRACT

Humanitarian crisis require a responsive and agile response. The number of professional and volunteer organization involved in the response to humanitarian disasters has increased over the past year, making coordination more important than ever before. This paper discusses the main issues of Humanitarian Disaster Management (HDM) coordination and the different modes applied on the field. We argue that while these challenges have been addressed by scientific literature with dedicated solutions, there is still a considerable gap between humanitarian best practice and academic state of the art.

This paper proposes a field-oriented methodology to bridge this gap. We analyze the findings from field research on the Typhoon Haiyan response (Philippines, 2013) and deduce practitioners’ requirements for HDM coordination support systems. Then we suggest a research agenda from a gap analysis comparing requirements with the existing solutions and the scientific approaches.

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Disaster E-Health: A New Paradigm for Collaborative Healthcare in Disasters

A C Norris, S Martinez, L Labaka, S Madanian, J J Gonzalez, D Parry

ABSTRACT

Disaster management and disaster medicine are well-established disciplines for responding to disasters and providing care for individuals whose health and well-being has been affected.  However, these disciplines have different origins, development, and priorities so that communication and coordination across them during disasters is often lacking, leading to delayed, sub-standard, inappropriate, or even unavailable. Moreover, neither discipline exploits the new range of e-health technologies such as the electronic health record or telehealth and mobile health that are revolutionizing non-disaster healthcare. We need a new paradigm that applies information and e-health technologies to improve disaster health planning and response. This paper describes the initial stages of a project to develop such a paradigm by scoping and developing the area of disaster e-health.

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Experiencing GMA as a means of developing a conceptual model of the problem space involving understanding cascading effects in crises

Hayley Watson, Kim Hagen, Tom Ritchey

ABSTRACT

A complex challenge facing those involved in crisis management relates to how to manage cascading effects in crisis situations. This paper provides a practice-based insight into the use of General Morphological Analysis (GMA), a non-quantified modelling method that can enable a shared understanding of the various interdependencies involved in cascading crises, by creating a conceptual model of a problem space. This insight paper provides an understanding of the nature of the method, and to reveal the project-related experiences of the facilitator and researchers, thereby contributing to an understanding of the benefits and challenges associated with GMA. Authors find that GMA provided a useful means of a multidisciplinary group developing an initial conceptual model for a complex problem. Whilst a challenging experience, the method will be used for conducting gap analyses at a later stage in the project, thus providing benefits to understanding and managing cascading effects in crises. 

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